Author: Greg Richter

Greg is a news manager who covers Medicine, Public Health, Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems. He graduated from Rowan University, where he also worked in its Office of Media and Public Relations and also had a brief stint as its mascot for the opening of its medical school. Since then, he has lived in Philadelphia for eight years and worked in Penn Medicine’s Office of Communications, most recently as a senior medical communications officer. When not covering news at Drexel, he’s trying out a new recipe or trying to decide if he actually enjoys running. Follow him @DrexelGreg or view his blog posts here. Contact Greg at gdr33@drexel.edu or 215-895-2614.
Read More

Drexel Researchers Develop and Employ Cell-Based Approach to Studying Mechanisms of Gulf War Illness

Thirty years ago, George H.W. Bush was the U.S. President, and the United States was in a two-month war: Operation Desert Storm. A total of 154 U.S. service members died and approximately 250,000 returned home suffering from a host of chronic symptoms, ranging from memory deficits, mood disorders, gastrointestinal problems, to headaches and sleep disorders. These health problems, caused by exposure during battle to chemicals such as pesticides, nerve agents and certain prophylactic drugs, continue to plague these veterans — a diagnosis known as Gulf War Illness.

Read More

Q+A: How Can We Persuade Organ Donors to Vaccinate Against COVID-19?

More than 150 million Americans – 46% of the country – has received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, and 36% of the country’s population is fully vaccinated. Despite very rare side effects, public health officials consider vaccines to be effective at preventing severe illness and be the ticket to something resembling pre-pandemic life.haryha

Read More

The Pandemic Will End, but We’re Probably Stuck with the Coronavirus

Many scientists believe that SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for COVID-19, will become “endemic.” It will seasonally circulate in a similar fashion to the other common respiratory viruses, such as those that cause the common cold or flu. If this bears out, there will not be a true end to the pandemic (with accompanying ticker tape parade down Broad Street), but a gradual transition, to an illness that we will have to live with.